Here are some options for immediate crisis support:

If you are experiencing an emergency, dial 911 immediately.

To find the nearest emergency room, visit this page.

It’s difficult to define a crisis since everyone experiences situations differently. Our identities, culture, and other factors influence our day-to-day experiences as well as the common challenges, struggles and stressors that impact our lives.

Each Aggie Matters offers a few definitions below and will include the citation/reference so readers can see where we received this information.

  • According to the CDC, a crisis is defined as “an acute emotional upset; it is manifested in an inability to cope emotionally, cognitively, or behaviorally and to solves problems as usual.”
  • Crisis Text Line describes a crisis as a painful emotion for which you need immediate support.  Since 2013, Crisis Text Line has offered crisis support by text exchanging over 81 million messages throughout the United States. Some of the co-occurring issues that texters experience along with anxiety/stress include relationship troubles, sadness, suicide, isolation/loneliness, self-harm, abuse (emotional & physical), bullying, body image, substance abuse, grief, sexual identity and more.
  • The National Alliance on Mental Illness defines a mental health crisis as “any situation in which a person’s behavior puts them at risk of hurting themselves or others and/or prevents them from being able to care for themselves or function effectively in the community.”

1. Text 

Crisis Text Line is free, 24/7, immediate and confidential texting service for those in crisis. Text RELATE to 741741 from anywhere in the US to text with a trained Crisis Counselor.

How does it work?

  • First, you're in crisis which means you are experiencing a very painful emotion and you need support right now. 

  • If you feel like you need to talk to someone, text "RELATE" to 741741 and you'll receive two automated responses while the service connects you with a Crisis Counselor. The Crisis Counselor is a trained volunteer, not a professional. They can provide support, but not medical advice.

  • On average it may take 10 - 15 minutes connect you with a Crisis Counselor.  Once connected, they'll introduce themselves, reflect on what you’ve said, and invite you to share at your own pace.

  • You'll text back and forth with a Crisis Counselor until you feel you are at a "cool" and safe space. The conversation usually lasts anywhere from 15 - 45 minutes.

  • The goal of the conversation is to get you to a calm and safe space. Sometimes you'll get referrals for additional support and other times this may mean the Crisis Counselor is just being there to support and listen to you. 

For more information about the Crisis Text Line, go to this page for frequently asked questions! 

 

Want to get involved?

You can do your part in raising awareness for Crisis Text Line by helping us spread the word!

Download the Crisis Text Line toolkit by clicking here.

Please reference this page when promoting the UC Davis Crisis Text Line keyword and if you're on social media tag us @EachAggieMatters. 

A person texting on their phone

 

2. Call

UC Davis Crisis Resources

Community Resources

National Resources

The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is a national network of local crisis centers that provides free and confidential emotional support to people in suicidal crisis or emotional distress 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Call 800-273-TALK (8255) to speak with someone today.

For Deaf & Hard of Hearing, dial 800-799-4889.

En Espanol, llama al 1-888-628-9454 para hablar con alguien.